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+Real-Time Ash Project

    Engine ash emissions are composed of the non-combustible portions of Diesel particulate matter derived mainly from lubricating oil, and can overtime, degrade diesel particulate filter performance. The objective of the Real-Time Ash Project is to implement and characterize a new method for measuring engine ash emissions, and possibly oil consumption, in real-time without using a tracer in the lubricating oil. The method has been characterized with atomized lubricating oil and Diesel engine exhaust and is currently being used to study ash penetration through diesel particulate filters. Contact Dave Gladis for more info.
    This work is funded through a gift from BP-Castrol and Corning.

+Superbus Project

    The goal of the Superbus project is to reduce fuel consumption of a state-of-the-industry electric hybrid bus. An energy audit was performed as the bus ran routes through Minneapolis. This audit continuously monitored the work output of the engine and the energy consumption of the alternator, the air conditioning unit, the hydraulic pumps, and the air compressor. The data from the audit was then used to make an argument for (1) the electrification of accessories and (2) a more efficient scheme of generating electricity, whether that be a small diesel auxiliary power unit (APU) or a fuel cell. Future work will implement electrically-driven accessories, and a diesel APU and/or fuel cell. Contact Jeff Campbell for more info.
    The Superbus project is funded by Metro Transit, Center for Transportation Studies, and Institute for Renewable Energy and Environment.

+MicroTurbine Testing

    The goal of the MicroTurbine project is to demonstrate the use of straight vegeatble oils as fuels for turbine.
See the project website for further information.

+HCCI Activities

    The objective of this project is to develop a means of using nearly pure ethanol as a diesel engine fuel by using hydrogen rich gases to facilitate the combustion. See the Project Poster for more info.
    This work is funded by the Minnesota Corngrowers Association.

+Hydrogen Assisted Combustion

    The objective of the Hydrogen Assisted Combustion of Ethanol in Diesel Engines project is to develop a means of using nearly pure ethanol as a diesel engine fuel by using hydrogen rich gases to facilitate the combustion. See the Project Poster for more info.
    This work is funded by the Minnesota Corngrowers Association.

+Diesel Engines and Nanoparticles

    We are working on a number of ongoing projects that seek to elucidate the impact of emission control technology, fuel sulfur content, and dilution conditions and methods on nanoparticle formation in dilute Diesel engine exhaust. Real or semi-real time instruments, including TSI's nanoSMPS and EEPS are used to measure particle size and concentration down to 2.5 nm.
    One specific project is focused on determining under what circumstances nanoparticle precursors, like sulfates and hydrocarbons, are stored on and subsequently released from Diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC) and particulate filters (DPF). Experiments have been conducted using John Deere and Caterpillar Diesel engines that are equipped DOCs and catalyzed and un-catalyzed DPFs. Our results have certain implications for future emission tests for in-use aged vehicles and in general, on understanding the true influence of fuel and lube oil sulfur content on nanoparticle formation.
    Contact Jacob Swanson or visit his website for more information.



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Last modified: 29 September 2015